E-Learning Readiness at Community Colleges

I work for two large community college systems in the Houston, Texas area where I am a part-time instructor, or adjunct faculty member. Lone Star College and Houston Community College have both adopted e-learning programs that allow students to complete a two-year degree entirely online. Lone Star College has an average enrollment of approximately 95,000 students and offers an online Associate of Arts degree with optional concentrations in Business, Criminal Justice, Speech Communication, and International Studies as well as an online Associate of Science degree with an optional concentration in Computer Science. Houston Community College has an average enrollment of approximately 47,000 students and delivers a slightly more varied selection of online degree plans by offering an Associate of Arts degree with concentrations in Communication, Business, Social Sciences, Humanities, and Fine Arts as well as an Associate of Science degree with concentrations in Computer Science, Engineering, Health and Natural Sciences, and Mathematics. Both institutions have invested heavily in e-learning as a viable alternative to traditional classroom instruction, as evidenced by their slick promotional web sites (http://www.lonestar.edu/lsc-online/ and http://de.hccs.edu/) designed to sell e-learning course options to prospective students.

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Best Practices in E-Learning

Even though e-learning has been around for decades, there is still a need to identify best practices in the field for practitioners new to the discipline.  While there are many approaches to the subject of how to identify best practices for e-learning, the most common are institutional (Irlbeck, 2008; Stansfield et al., 2009), which looks at the implementation of e-learning from a institution-wide perspective, and pedagogical (Keengwe, Onchwari, & Agamba, 2014; Reilly, Vandenhouten, Gallagher-Lepak, & Ralston-Berg, 2012), which looks at the implementation of e-learning from the more limited scope of classroom integration and practitioner training.  Pachler and Daly (2011) identify several different eras of e-learning research, but are careful to caution that the field is fast-moving and is liable to slip the bonds of any classificatory system before it is brought into mainstream use.  With these facts in mind, I wish to examine the various findings concerning best practices for e-learning, first from an institutional perspective and second from a pedagogical perspective.  Then, with an understanding of the best practices from these two perspectives, I will offer an overview of the challenges, opportunities, and best practices in e-learning as a unified discipline.

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Why Teaching a Humanities Course Is Harder Than It Looks

I’m teaching three humanities courses this semester and so far it’s been an interesting journey. There have been no major hiccups in the lessons I’ve given and the results of the quizzes and writing assignments I’ve assigned have been mostly positive.

However, there’s something about teaching a general humanities course that bothers me just a little bit. My field is the humanities… in a general sense. I don’t have a degree with “Humanities” printed on it, but I do have several degrees in the related areas of philosophy and literature, which counts as being qualified to teach a humanities survey course. The problem I see with offering a broad course in the humanities is that you will never be able to find an instructor who is fully qualified to teach it. Read More …